Rhabdomyolysis and autoimmune variant stiff-person syndrome

  • Shreyas Gangadhara Division of Vascular Neurology, Department of Neurology, University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, United States.
  • Suhas Gangadhara Division of Vascular Neurology, Department of Neurology, University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, United States.
  • Chetan Gandhy Division of Vascular Neurology, Department of Neurology, University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL; Department of Neurology, James A Haley Veterans Hospital, Tampa, FL, United States.
  • Derrick Robertson | droberts@health.usf.edu Division of Vascular Neurology, Department of Neurology, University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, United States.

Abstract

Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is a rare neurologic disorder characterized by waxing and waning muscular rigidity, stiffness and spasms. Three subtypes have been described: paraneoplastic, autoimmune and idiopathic. Rhabdomyolysis has been described in the paraneoplastic variant, but to our knowledge no case has been reported involving the autoimmune variant. We report a case report of a 50-year-old man with history of SPS who presented with recurrent episodes of severe limb and back spasms. He was hospitalized on two separate occasions for uncontrollable spasms associated with renal failure and creatinine phosphokinase elevations of 55,000 and 22,000 U/L respectively. Laboratory tests were otherwise unremarkable. The acute renal failure resolved during both admissions with supportive management. Rhabdomyolysis has the potential to be fatal and early diagnosis is essential. It should be considered in patients who have SPS and are experiencing an exacerbation of their neurologic condition.

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Published
2016-11-30
Section
Case Reports
Keywords:
Stiff-person syndrome, rhabdomyolysis, spasms.
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How to Cite
Gangadhara, S., Gangadhara, S., Gandhy, C., & Robertson, D. (2016). Rhabdomyolysis and autoimmune variant stiff-person syndrome. Clinics and Practice, 6(4). https://doi.org/10.4081/cp.2016.885