A case of orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

  • Takeshi Kusunoki | ttkusunoki001@aol.com Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Kaori Kase Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Katsuhisa Ikeda Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

Orbital apex syndrome is commonly been thought to have a poor prognosis. Many cases of this syndrome have been reported to be caused by paranasal sinus mycosis. We encountered a very rare case (60-year-old woman) of sinusitis with orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. She had received insulin and dialysis for diabtes and diabetic nephropathy, moreover anticoagulants after heart by-pass surgery. She underwent endoscopic sinus operation and was treated with antibiotics, but her loss of left vision did not improve. Recently, sinusitis cases due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa were reported to be a increasing. Therefore, we should consider the possibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as well as mycosis as infections of the sinus, especially inpatients who are immunocompromised body.

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Author Biographies

Takeshi Kusunoki, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo

Department of Otorhinolaryngology

Associate Professor

Kaori Kase, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo

Department of Otorhinolaryngology

Katsuhisa Ikeda, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo

Department of Otorhinolaryngology

chief Professor

Published
2011-11-29
Section
Case Reports
Keywords:
sinusitis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, orbital apex syndrome, visual disturbance, endoscopic sinus operation.
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How to Cite
Kusunoki, T., Kase, K., & Ikeda, K. (2011). A case of orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Clinics and Practice, 1(4), e127. https://doi.org/10.4081/cp.2011.e127