Ingestion of a foreign body unmasks an asymptomatic small bowel carcinoid tumor

  • Yi-Zarn Wang | ywang@lsuhsc.edu Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans LA, United States.
  • Patrick Greiffenstein Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans LA, United States.

Abstract

Bowel obstruction is a common surgical admission around the world. On the other hand, small intestinal tumors, such as midgut carcinoid, are uncommon neoplasms and an infrequent cause of intestinal obstruction leading to hospitalization. A foreign body is an extremely rare cause of intestinal obstruction and when ingested, foreign bodies most often lodge in the narrowest portion of the gastrointestinal tract. Narrowing of the small bowel due to a neoplasm can prohibit the passage of an accidentally ingested foreign object and produce an obstruction that neither the neoplasm nor the foreign body could have produced alone. We hereby report a case in which an accidentally ingested piece of foreign material leads to the finding of a small, early stage, asymptomatic, midgut carcinoid cancer in the proximal ileum that would have otherwise eluded detection for several years.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Published
2011-12-30
Section
Case Reports
Keywords:
carcinoid, midgut, gastrointestinal tract.
Statistics
Abstract views: 527

PDF: 293
HTML: 1405
Share it

PlumX Metrics

PlumX Metrics provide insights into the ways people interact with individual pieces of research output (articles, conference proceedings, book chapters, and many more) in the online environment. Examples include, when research is mentioned in the news or is tweeted about. Collectively known as PlumX Metrics, these metrics are divided into five categories to help make sense of the huge amounts of data involved and to enable analysis by comparing like with like.

How to Cite
Wang, Y.-Z., & Greiffenstein, P. (2011). Ingestion of a foreign body unmasks an asymptomatic small bowel carcinoid tumor. Clinics and Practice, 2(1), e2. https://doi.org/10.4081/cp.2012.e2