You can’t judge a book by its cover or a tumor by its expression profile

  • Steven M. Sorscher | SSorsche@DOM.wustl.edu Washington University in St. Louis, School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri, United States.
  • Theodore Thomas Washington University in St. Louis, School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri, United States.

Abstract

Expression profiling has shown great promise in matching cancers of unknown primary to likely primary tumors of origin based on patterns of mRNA expression. However, it remains uncertain as to whether even well matched tumors will demonstrate the clinical features, such as rate of progression, of their matched counterparts. In this case report, we note that based on histology, immunohistochemistry and expression profile this patient’s poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumor would have been expected to grow very rapidly on no therapy. Instead, this cancer was very indolent, with only very little radiographic progression over several years. We believe this report represents a remarkable case of a tumor where features, including expression profile, would not at all have accurately predicted the clinical course seen. While some series have suggested that matching by expression profiling predicts outcome, this case shows a dramatically different result.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Steven M. Sorscher, Washington University in St. Louis, School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri

Associate Professor


Theodore Thomas, Washington University in St. Louis, School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri

Resident

 

 

Published
2012-01-31
Section
Case Reports
Keywords:
neuroendocrine, unknown, expression profiling.
Statistics
Abstract views: 693

PDF: 446
HTML: 85
Share it

PlumX Metrics

PlumX Metrics provide insights into the ways people interact with individual pieces of research output (articles, conference proceedings, book chapters, and many more) in the online environment. Examples include, when research is mentioned in the news or is tweeted about. Collectively known as PlumX Metrics, these metrics are divided into five categories to help make sense of the huge amounts of data involved and to enable analysis by comparing like with like.

How to Cite
Sorscher, S., & Thomas, T. (2012). You can’t judge a book by its cover or a tumor by its expression profile. Clinics and Practice, 2(1), e21. https://doi.org/10.4081/cp.2012.e21